Give Me Fluency

Mastering Spanish & Obtaining Fluency


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Interview on German Website, ErfolgreichesSprachenlernen.com- In Spanish!

samuel-arredondo-original-1024x576Recently, I was interviewed by Christine Konstantinidis on her website Erfolgreiches Sprachenlernen (Successful Language Learning), which can be found here:

Christine Konstantinidis is  a linguist who has been working in the language field for decades. She has written a book on language learning in German called Sprachen lernen – Tolle Tipps und Tricks: Kreative Methoden für Motivation und maximalen Erfolg which in English means Learning languages – Great tips and tricks: Creative methods for motivation and maximum success. If you can read in German, you may want to grab yourself a copy for some good information. It can be found here on Amazon.

christines-bookThe interview in the link above is on Christine’s website, which is in German. The interview itself is in Spanish. She has also translated the entire interview into German for her German speaking fans. Translation is not always an easy feat, but Christine does an excellent job.

If you interested in checking out the German version of the interview, you can find it here.

samuel-arredondo-1024x576

-Sam

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Something’s On The Roof

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Below is an an excerpt from Chapter 2 of Something’s On The Roof, which is part of my soon-to-be released Cuentos Breves En Inglés book. This book features not-so-common English words to expand the vocabulary of the Spanish-speaking English learner. A vocabulary list will be at the end of each chapter, as seen below this one…

El siguiente extracto viene del Capítulo 2 de Something’s On The Roof, el cual es un pasaje de mi próximo libro Cuentos Breves En Inglés. Este libro presenta palabras que no son muy comunes que ayudarán al estudiante de Inglés a ampliar su vocabulario. Habrá una lista de palabras al final de cada cápitulo…

ch-2

You guys hungry? You look hungry.”

Chimi and Changa always look at me as though they understand.

Here’s your favorite:

Moisty Chunks dog food.

I opened the packet and poured it into their bowl.

Of course they didn’t eat it.

And I could just imagine their thoughts:

We don’t want that crap! Why don’t you eat it?

They decided instead to sit and stare at me

while I ate my cereal and toast.

The day was long, and I felt like a zombie from lack of sleep.

I went to work, which is about 30 feet away from my dining room table.

I sat there in my office, staring at the computer screen.

I’ve been writing for a long time now,

but I started doing it full-time about a year ago,

after I retired from the tire shop.

I sat there in my faux-leather chair trying to write my story

the one about aliens that land in a dry river bed

and slowly take over a small town,

terrorizing people and animals alike.

As I sat there, I couldn’t help thinking about the night before.

What were the dogs barking at?

A coyote? Each other?

I went to the bedroom and sat my high-powered air rifle

in the corner of the room, right next to my bed.

My 9mm Glock 17 was still in the closet if I needed it, but if there is an animal coming into the back patio at night, the BB gun will be enough to scare it away.

I have become more sentimental towards animals in general

since getting Chimi and Changa two and a half years ago,

so killing the little critter would be something I would try to avoid.

I sat down at my HP laptop again and started to write.

This time, a little less worried than before.

The alien spaceship landed in the riverbed with almost no sound at all. The hatch slowly opened and pressed against the river rocks below, scaring away the

group of young cotton tails that had sat there

blinded by the bright lights of the huge machine…”

VOCABULARY

(Are) You guys hungry? ¿Tienen/Tenéis hambre?
To pour Verter, echar
I could just imagine Podría imaginar
Their thoughts Sus pensamientos
That crap Esa mierda
The lack of sleep La falta de sueño
The dining room El comedor
The computer screen La pantalla de la computadora/el ordenador
I’ve been writing for a long time now Llevo mucho tiempo escribiendo ya
Full-time A tiempo completo
The tire shop El taller de reparación de llantas/neumáticos
Faux-leather chair Silla de cuero de imitación
Aliens Extraterrestres
To land Aterrizar
A dry river bed Un lecho seco
To take over Tomar control de
To terrorize Aterrorizar
The night before La noche anterior
High-powered air rifle Rifle/carabina de aire comprimido
The closet El armario
The BB gun (ball bullet) Rifle de balines
To scare away Ahuyentar
To avoid Evitar
Laptop Ordenador/computadora portátil
Less worried than before Menos preocupado que antes
The spaceship La nave espacial
With no sound En silencio
The hatch La escotilla
Pressed against the river rocks below Presionó contra las piedras del río abajo
The cotton tails Los conejos de cola blanca
Blinded by the bright lights Enceguecidos por las luces brillantes
The huge machine La enorme maquinaria


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I figured I’d list my Korean learning routine for the tens and tens of readers of my blog:

  • Wake up at 4:30 AM.
  • Grab some coffee, a necessary nutrient.
  • By 5 AM, sit down at my desk with my “Korean From Zero” book.
  • Using the lessons, I write down every bit of Korean on the page of the book.
  • I usually end up write 1.5 to 2 pages of Korean.
  • I have not been writing vocabulary lists, just learning the words as I go along, getting to review them as the resurface.
  • If words or phrases do not make sense, or I otherwise have a question about them, I write them on my mini whiteboard and ask my wife later on, usually after I come home from work. (I’m very fortunate, as my wife is from South Korean and speaks Korean natively. This is also a main motive for learning Korean.)
  • I listen to Korean in my vehicle, whether it be podcasts or news, etc. I still don’t understand a lot, but my ears are being trained.
  • When evenings, I’ll sit with the wifey and watch a movie, news, or youtube videos in Korean. I’ve learned not to continuously say stuff like, “What does that mean? What did he say? Hey! I know that word!”. But occasionally, she will explain the gist of what’s going on. 🙂
  • Before going to bed, I’ll get on Memrise, which I’m sure if your interested enough to read this blog, you have heard of.
  • That’s pretty much it for now. I’m just taking it slow and easy and I realize that Korean language, being so diverse from Western or European languages, will take me a lot more time to learn and be proficient. It’s so much different from Spanish, Italian, Esperanto, or anything else I have studied.
  • If you have any suggestions for my language study, please comment!